We’ve got the best aurora-viewing site in northern Canada.

You’ll enjoy the privacy of watching from your own cottage as well as our cozy, heated viewing rooms.

Your chances of seeing the northern lights during your stay are much higher than on a time-limited bus tour.

If the night skies are clear and the aurora are active, you may see them as early as 6pm or as late as 7am in the morning.

Viewing tips: BE VIGILANT! Pay attention!

– We recommend regular checks outside (with cottage lights off). Check every 30 minutes when stars are visible, or every 90 minutes in cloudy weather.

Capturing aurora on your camera means you can share your experience with friends and family. We recommend using a DSLR camera and tripod combination.

Some basic recommended settings for quality aurora photography:

ISO – setting should be at 800+

Shutter speed – 15-20 seconds (you will need a tripod to keep the camera still)

Aperture – Wide angle lens is good; pick the lowest possible number for your F-stop setting.

Aurora displays in the northern skies most commonly produce a fluorescent green glow; on occasion they glow pink, purple, blue and even red.

They can look like white or coloured flowing curtains, spirals, arcs and also appear as a faint glowing cloud.

Often you can observe the lights dancing across the night skies or glow unchanging in a solid band for hours. Sometimes they only last for 10 minutes.

We’ve got the best aurora-viewing site in northern Canada.

You’ll enjoy the privacy of watching from your own cottage as well as our cozy, heated viewing rooms.

Your chances of seeing the northern lights during your stay are much higher than on a time-limited bus tour.

If the night skies are clear and the aurora are active, you may see them as early as 6pm or as late as 7am in the morning.

Viewing tips: BE VIGILANT! Pay attention!

– We recommend regular checks outside (with cottage lights off). Check every 30 minutes when stars are visible, or every 90 minutes in cloudy weather.

– Capturing aurora on your camera means you can share your experience with friends and family. We recommend using a DSLR camera and tripod combination.

Some basic recommended settings for quality aurora photography:

ISO – setting should be at 800+

Shutter speed – 15-20 seconds (you will need a tripod to keep the camera still)

Aperture – Wide angle lens is good; pick the lowest possible number for your F-stop setting.

Aurora displays in the northern skies most commonly produce a fluorescent green glow; on occasion they glow pink, purple, blue and even red.

They can look like white or coloured flowing curtains, spirals, arcs and also appear as a faint glowing cloud.

Often you can observe the lights dancing across the night skies or glow unchanging in a solid band for hours. Sometimes they only last for 10 minutes.